SPORTS FOR ...

Build (character)

with balls-

Gross motor skills

 

We won’t even discuss the  health benefits of exercise for both adults and children. Just get up and do it. However we will mention a study conducted by Michael Gurian, PhD over the period of 22 years on said benefits especially when boys physical and brain development is concerned. Gurian went further and published his findings in the book" the Mind of Boys" and we strongly recommend that you reference it if you have any doubts.

 

Involvement in sports does not only keep the doctor and diseases away but it builds character.

 

Grab a ball, any ball and go outside. You teach hand/eye coordination; body coordination- running and marching; catching, throwing, aiming, distance, acceleration, team work, following the rules, discipline, how to be tough - your mama is not here - and how to be cool.  You are raising a super hero! And only a Super Dad can raise a Super Hero!

 

The program is designed to meet  and adapt to different levels of functioning and ability- from emerging to advanced. You work on upper body strength, low body strength, body posture, breathing and rhythm.

 

(Essential for every child and father. The best thing you can ever offer to your children as a dad is play. They will remember the time with you forever.)

 

Our programs have hidden elements and hidden agenda. We have consulted with special education professionals for what is the best way to introduce new skills to special needs children  without the chance of failure. Foregoing the element of play and introducing the skill in purely academic model often put pressure on the children and they give up on the task if they don't fail at it.

The programs are designed with these prinicples in mind and can be easily adapted to conform to the ability of your child  and to ensure that the child will not fail and will remian motivated to learn new skills.

The Rule of the Thumb is to adapt the task to the present level of functioning of each child and implement the rules of neuroplasticity while engaging the child.  If something is not fun, novelty or sensational, our brain gives no attention to it, lacking the interest to engage.